Antiquarian Anabaptist

Apologetics from an Anabaptist perspective

Tag Archives: values

Hard work is not a Christian virtue

The robots are coming. Technology already exists that could eliminate almost half of all jobs over the next ten years. Working harder isn’t going to save your job if it is on that list. Working smarter isn’t going to do it either. The economy is changing and the best way to ride the wave of change is to change our attitude about work.

Several years ago a business magazine did a survey of the qualities that businesses were looking for when hiring new employees. The top two items on that list were a desire to serve others and an aptitude to work with others in a team environment. Those sound like Christian virtues, don’t they?

Let’s stop telling young people entering the job market that if they are willing to work really hard they will always have a job. T’aint necessarily so. Especially not in the coming economic transformation. The old ideals of individualistic effort are about to be cast on the scrap heap.

We Christians have absorbed an idea from the world around us that values a person by the amount he produces. We also expect that success equates high production with the ability to spend more on the things we consume. Could we shift our attitude to value a person by what he or she contributes to the common good? That would seem more like a Christian value system, unless we would try to measure that contribution in dollars and cents.

W. Edwards Deming became a hero to Japanese industry when he showed them how to drastically improve the quality of their products in the years after World War II. It wasn’t until 1980, when Deming was 80 years old, that US business started to pay attention to what he had to say. His analysis of American management methods were devastating. He told companies that they needed to drive out fear and eliminate barriers between departments so that everyone could work together for the good of the business. He condemned annual performance reviews, saying they forced employees to compete against each other rather than working together for the common good.

In the survey I quoted earlier, educational accomplishments came far down the list of qualities that business leaders were looking for in new hires. Graduates who have a piece of paper showing their success in the classroom may well expect prospective employers to give them preferential treatment. The problem is that things learned in the classroom usually don’t have much practical value in the workplace.

Employers do want employees who are willing to be life long learners. They just want to be able to direct their employees towards learning things that will directly apply to their work and thus be of benefit to the business. Many years ago Henry Ford said: “Anyone who stops learning is old, whether at twenty or eighty. Anyone who keeps learning stays young. The greatest thing in life is to keep your mind young.”

To put this all together, as Christians we should be teaching the value of a servant spirit. This should be evident in every area of life. Can we really serve God and not be willing to serve our fellow man?

Ideas like “I know better” or “I can do it better” should have no place in Christian life. We should not expect them to be useful in our work life either. Success in the coming economy will not go to the one who works the hardest to prove that he can do things faster and better than someone else. The person who dedicates his efforts towards the success of the whole group will be a valued member of any team.

 

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Loving God

It is important to have an assurance that God loves me just the way I am. But is that the most important factor in Christian life?

The Law and the Gospels tell us that: “Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy strength, and with all thy mind; and thy neighbour as thyself. ” This quote is from Luke 10:27, but the same instructions are found in Deuteronomy, Matthew and Mark.

Now, since love is the gift of God, part of the fruit of the Spirit, we really don’t have to be concerned about whether we love God – right? I wish. In a way, it really is that simple, but we humans have a talent for making simple things complicated.

First off, I start by thinking God and I see things the same way and what He wants for me is exactly the same as what I want for me. You’ve got to love a God like that. Then things start to go awry, things don’t happen the way I thought I had a right to expect — and my relationship with God starts to get a little sour. Why wasn’t God listening to me?

Eventually a little wisdom begins to develop — God knew all along that the things I wanted would not be good for me, wouldn’t turn out like I expected. He tried to warn me — I was the one who wasn’t listening. A hard lesson.

For a time I go on in a constant state of agitation and tension between the things I want and the things God wants for me. This is not a good place to be, the problems get bigger and bigger — to the point that it becomes almost impossible to believe that there is a way out.

How many years does it take before the light dawns that my problems are big because I haven’t allowed God to be God in my life? Oh, I have always wanted to serve Him and I have not wandered away from Him. But I never really comprehended how big He is. I have relegated Him to a small corner of my life and tried to conquer my problems alone, with just a bit of advice from Him from time to time.

Why don’t I just let Him take charge of the whole big mess? Things aren’t going to turn out as I had anticipated, they are going to turn out far better, because now I am allowing God to show me what is truly valuable.

When I learn to let God be God, and love Him with every fibre of my being, my problems don’t go away. But now they are dwarfed by this great big wonderful God who has control of my life.

What is wrong with this picture?

We send missionaries all over the world from our North American congregations. We rejoice when reports come back of the faith taking root in countries where the prevailing belief is animism, Hinduism, Buddhism or Islam.

Then we go into Tim Horton’s and the person behind the counter is a recent immigrant from one of those countries and we complain about her accent. What is wrong with this picture?

I’ll venture a guess or two. First, in our minds we have separated mission work from normal Christian life. People from (almost) every country in the world are showing up virtually on our doorstep and it doesn’t click that here is a mission field right in front of us. You have to leave home and cross an ocean to do mission work, don’t you?

Secondly, we too easily assume that people around us aren’t interested in the gospel. If they were they would come to church wouldn’t they? Let’s be really honest here: who is it that isn’t interested? Is it them or us?

Thirdly, we like living in our little bubble where nothing much happens to disturb our accustomed cycle of work, leisure and church activities. It’s hard for us to conceive of how it would be if some of these people entered into our circle. They’re not like us, everything would change if too many of them became part of our congreagation.

Here we are then. Christianity has fallen into disrepute in our land; only ten to fifteen percent of the population attend a church, and many of those churches are more based on tradition or intellectualism than on the Bible. And we are helpless to do anything about it.

Or are we? If we are born-again believers, readers of the Bible, led of the Holy Spirit, don’t we have the tools to reach out to people around us? Perhaps we are just too unaccustomed to using those tools.

Let’s take an interest in other people, get to know them, ask questions about their lives, their aspirations, what is important to them. Then tell them in a simple way about the things that are most important to us. And I don’t mean our material possessions or the accomplishments of our children. Share the things that are of eternal value. Many people will never have heard such things before.

 

A NEW DAY . . . .

This is the beginning of a new day.
God has given me this day to use as I will.
I can waste it . . . or use it for good,
but what I do today is important,
because I am exchanging a day of my life for it!
When tomorrow comes, this day will be gone forever,
leaving in its place something that I have traded for it.
I want it to be gain, and not loss;
good, and not evil; success, and not failure;
in order that I shall not regret the price that I have paid for it.

-Author Unknown

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