Flatlander Faith

Apologetics from an Anabaptist perspective

Category Archives: Whimsy

Why reverends should refrain from making public policy pronouncements

Image by torstensimon from Pixabay

The Most Reverend Justin Welby, Archbishop of Canterbury, in a recent speech to the British parliament, was highly critical of Canada for over-ordering Covid-19 vaccines. He said that we have five times what we need in the pipeline.

The view from this end of the pipeline is quite different. The pipeline ran dry the week before last and the proportion of people vaccinated so far is much less than many other countries. The vaccines are supposed to start trickling out of the pipeline again next week, but there are great uncertainties about how long it will take to receive enough for all of our population.

The Canadian government has no plan to vaccinate us all five or ten times, nor to stockpile more than we need so other countries cannot get what they need. They are just trying to get enough, from whatever source they can. They have ordered from a number of different companies. Many of those vaccines are not even approved as yet.

I don’t want to seem disrespectful of the Most Reverend Mr. Welby, but I wish he would have shown a little more respect for the facts.

Planet Earth: Future Haze

I think my wife has a kindly way of cutting through the swirling fog of prophetic teachings.

Christine's Collection

As I sat down to write more about the subject of pre-millennialism, I asked my husband how he remembers this and that. So he’s handed me several books on the subject of prophecy. About a weeks’ worth of reading. 🙂 Prophecy is so complex and so much could be written, but I’d really like to keep this simple for those of you who are interested in reading it.
Let’s start in the dim distant past….

The Dormant Pre-millennial Doctrine Starts to Grow

According to Dave MacPherson in his book, The Incredible Cover-Up – © 1975 by Logos International – there was some pre-millennial thinking in the US colonies before 1830. It did rise somewhat during the mid-1800s with currents blowing in from a mini charismatic revival in Scotland and England, together with J N Darby’s teachings. It really began to take hold during the Civil War and by the 1870s…

View original post 1,832 more words

Pookie the Policeman

There are five residents in this house, two humans and three cats. The humans are seniors and two of the cats are getting close to that stage of life. The third is a kitten, a bright-eyed, affectionate, fearless and hyperactive bundle of fluff.

Experts say that cats are capable of more than 100 vocal sounds. Angus, our oldest cat, uses them all. Pookie, the second oldest, hardly uses them at all. He showed up on our doorstep almost ten years ago, just sitting there and staring at the door. When I opened the door, he walked in. He seems to believe in telepathy. When he wants out he sits and looks at the door until one of us gets up and opens it. If he’s desperate he will reach up and tap one of us on the arm. When he’s outside and wants to come in, he sits by the door and stares at it. That always works for him, though sometimes he has to wait awhile.

It’s a mystery to me how Pookie communicates with the other cats. He’s not a scrapper, he doesn’t ever make much noise, but they know not to mess with Pookie. Tuffy, the youngest cat, often jumps on Angus and they start wrestling. Nobody gets hurt, but it can get noisy at times and sometimes they chase each other through the house. It looks like Angus enjoys it, up to a point, but it’s a little like a 10 year old boy always wanting to wrestle with his grandfather.

Lately Pookie has taken on the role of policeman. Several days ago Tuffy and Angus were noisily wrestling on the living room floor. The disturbance awakened Pookie and he came to investigate. He didn’t make a sound, yet they stopped their scrap and looked at him. First he fixed Angus with a glare and Angus slunk off to hide behind the recliner. Pookie then fixed his glare on Tuffy, who slunk off in the other direction.

They were at it again this afternoon. Pookie came along as they dashed down the hall. Pookie sat down on the dining room floor and waited. Tuffy came strolling back, on a path that would have taken him in front of Pookie, then veered off and went behind him, Pookie eying him all the time. Tuffy walked over to the couch, reached up and started scratching on the arm. Pookie walked over and gave him a swat. Tuffy stopped, walked away and lay down on the floor. A few minutes later all five of us were enjoying a peaceful Sunday afternoon nap.

14 things you (probably) didn’t know about Christianity, but really should – Premier Christianity

Nobody gets to heaven by being good, faith is not a blind leap and there’s much more evidence than you think. Andrew Haslam clears up these and other common misconceptions about Christianity

Source: 14 things you (probably) didn’t know about Christianity, but really should – Premier Christianity

The Kingdom of Jesus Christ

This is the first of a series of articles about the kingdom of Christ that my wife has written and posted on her blog. I have written on the topic from time to time, but I feel she has summed things up more clearly than I have.

Christine's Collection

For the most part I like to keep my writing brief and easy to read, but now I feel the urge to do a few posts on a subject thoroughly hashed over by Christians for ages:
What is – and where is – the Kingdom of Jesus Christ?

This topic may not interest a lot of my readers, but I’ll tag these posts Prophecy so you can follow them if you’re interested in what I have to say on this subject. I want to look at some of the prophesies and the theological potpourri we’ve waded through in our day, hoping to shed some light and not spark too much heat. But before I start, I’ll give you some of our background so you’ll know…

Where I’m Coming From

Outside of weddings and funerals, my family rarely darkened a church door. Mom F was a believer and packed me and…

View original post 719 more words

A little knowledge is a dangerous thing

Image by StockSnap from Pixabay 

The title is quoted from lines that Alexander Pope wrote 300 years ago. In popular culture only the first line is remembered, with knowledge substituted for learning, as I have done above.

A little learning is a dangerous thing;
drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring:
there shallow draughts intoxicate the brain,
and drinking largely sobers us again.

Both of my father’s parents died of acute indigestion. At least that’s what their death certificates said. My grandfather died in 1912 and my grandmother in 1927, in the doctor’s office. Such was the state of medical knowledge 100 years ago that chest pains were attributed to indigestion. Doctors, and most of the rest of us, know a little more today. Still, my doctor told me of a man in his examining room with chest discomfort who said, “All I need is a big burp, doctor.” The doctor knew better, this man was having a massive heart attack, and treating it as indigestion wasn’t going to save his life.

Nowadays, medical information is just a mouse click away. Some of it is good, some not so good and some is downright dangerous. Some folks choose to believe the advice that best suits their inclinations. Alexander Pope didn’t know about the internet, but his words are very fitting. A few sips at this fountain of knowledge is intoxicating, making us feel that we are experts, knowing more than the professionals. That intoxication can be deadly, for ourselves, or for someone who takes our ill-informed advice.

Changes

A barber once told me “Men don’t lose their hair as they grow older. The hair that disappears from the top of your head just moves to different places. Your eyebrows get bushier and tufts of hair grow out of your ears and nostrils.”

I guess he was right; the hair on top is receding but now I need to trim hair in locations I never gave a thought to until a couple of years ago. That’s something you young fellows have to look forward to.

The intruder

Image by ivabalk from Pixabay 

A few years ago I took an old picnic cooler, cut a square hole in one corner large enough for a cat to go through, put an old blanket on the bottom, and set it on our back step. It was meant as a shelter for our cats if they were outside in cold or stormy weather.

Tuesday morning Chris opened the door to let Angus and Poolie go outside. A half-grown kitten emerged from the cat shelter and walked in the open door. He has made himself right at home here, even though we’re not sure we need another cat. Angus and Pookie are especially dubious about that.

He is obviously accustomed to being a house cat and has been well cared for, though probably went a day or two without food. He is going to be big, his ancestry is probably largely Norwegian Forest cat, (I had to look that up, I knew there was a long-haired Norwegian cat with a ruff, the only name that came to mind was Norwegian Elkhound and that’s a dog so it couldn’t be right.)

If he had been a stray that long hair would be messy and matted, and it wasn’t. He didn’t wander in from the farm next door (we asked) and the next closest house is a kilometre away. Chris’s guess is that he is getting to the age that he should be neutered and the previous owner didn’t want to pay the vet bill.

He is gentle, friendly, playful, cute and pushes himself into the middle of whatever is happening. Chris thinks we should call him Frosty, for the colour of the fur on his back. I’m afraid that if we give him a name that means we have accepted him as part of the family.

Cat vantage

Cats are asleep about two-thirds of the time, but their noses and ears seem to be always on the alert. Open a can of tuna in the kitchen without making a sound and the aroma will reach a cat who is sound asleep several rooms away. Soon she is by your feet, asking for a share. Rustling a bag of cat treats will often have the same effect.

A black cat is aware of the camouflage value of its coat. One of our cats noticed a mouse hole beside the garden shed and lay down close by under a maple tree. She became almost invisible in the dense shade and the hunt was successful.

Your cats can distinguish the sound of your automobile from all the others going by. When you get home they are waiting to greet you. One of our cats would sit on the back of the couch and push aside a vane of the vertical blinds to look out the window. When we drove up, especially after dark, there would be two golden eyes looking right at us.

A cat can sleep anywhere, sometimes in a secluded spot, often in your favourite chair. Sometimes they find a vantage point where they can keep track of everything going on in the house

Angus, who looks very much like the cat in the above picture, has chosen the washing machine as his vantage point. The other cat in the house cannot jump that high, so it belongs exclusively to Angus. He has a clear view from there out the hallway window, plus the people of the house frequently walk in front of him. He can then loudly demand attention and we don’t have to bend down to offer the attention and comfort he desires.

Looking for clues

“The future is an opaque mirror. Anyone who tries to look into it sees nothing but the dim outlines of an old worried face.” Jim Bishop.

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

BUT

“Almost all current events in the affairs of governments and nations have their parallels and precedents in the past.” Harry S. Truman

%d bloggers like this: