Antiquarian Anabaptist

Apologetics from an Anabaptist perspective

Not as easy as it looked

There is a little Christian bookstore in Sherbrooke, Québec that we used to visit when we lived in that province. I would buy a book or two and we would visit with Priscille, the lady who managed the store. I’m not sure if she worked there full time,  occasionally there would be someone else there.

Priscille was a wife and mother, also a writer. I have a book entitled Un chant nouveau (A New Song) containing mostly short songs and choruses for use in worship and Sunday School. Priscille wrote the words for six of the songs.

She also wrote verses for a greeting card company. There was a greeting card company in Ontario that also had a line of French language cards with spiritual messages and she wrote for them. Her teenage boy would sometimes remark that this was such easy money – Mom would write out a number of short messages, send them away and in a few weeks a cheque would come back. It seemed to him that Mom was taking money for not doing much at all.

There came a snow day when school was cancelled and there wasn’t much to do at home. Priscille gave him a pad of paper and suggested he try his hand at writing greeting card verses, promising that if he could come up with something good she would send it to the company so he could share in the easy money.

He eagerly sat down at the table and began to write; his mother went about her work. He wrote a few lines, crossed them out, wrote some more, crossed it out and wrote again. He tore off that sheet of paper, crumpled it up. threw it in the waste basket and started over.

Sheet after sheet went into the garbage and finally a plaintive wail was heard: “Mom, this is hard work!

Music to his mother’s ears, no doubt. Evidently though, the young lad did have a feeling for what good writing should be. One would hope that he didn’t give up on writing.

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