Antiquarian Anabaptist

Apologetics from an Anabaptist perspective

The inconvenient Jesus

Jesus was the enemy of formalism and legalism, the one who castigated the religious leaders of His day for their hypocrisy.  He was the friend of the poor, the oppressed, the outcasts and the sinners.  We like to believe that no matter what others may think of us, Jesus is our unconditional friend.

That isn’t far off the mark, but when we go to a funeral and hear that our dear departed uncle is now in heaven, all his sorrows are over, while we never noticed that our dear departed took any interest in preparing for heaven, then we begin to wonder if the picture has not gotten skewed.

Jesus’ own words are difficult (impossible) to reconcile with the picture of a Jesus who welcomes everyone to heaven, even if they never showed any desire to go there.  Things like: “Except a man be born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God,” and: “If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross daily, and follow me,”and even:  “If any man come to me, and hate not his father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters, yea, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple.”

Jesus had strange ideas of what it meant to be blessed: “Blessed are they which are persecuted for righteousness’ sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.  Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake.”

The meaning of these verses is that if heaven is not more important to us than all our earthly pride and possessions, even our own family, we are never going to make it there.  These, and many other of the hard sayings of Jesus are an inconvenient obstacle to those who wish to believe in a Jesus who will accept them on their own terms.

Things do not work that way in real life; we must accept Jesus on His terms.  That includes repentance, self-denial and for many people may include rejection by friends and family and even physical danger, persecution and death.

There was no easy way out for Jesus when He prayed in the Garden of Gethsemane: “Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour: but for this cause came I unto this hour” and: “Father, if thou be willing, remove this cup from me: nevertheless not my will, but thine, be done.”

He suffered the agony of the cross, blood poured from His wounds and His side.  He did not go through this to make life on earth easier for us, but to make eternal life in heaven possible for us.  Our way to heaven must also involve submission to the will of the Father, a willingness to forsake the thoughts and things that are highly esteemed by those around us and to bear the shame and reproach of the cross.

There are no short cuts, no easier pathway for someone who claims a special illumination.  Jesus is the way, the truth and the life, and His way is the narrow way.  If we want to be in heaven with Jesus, that way is the only way.  This is still good news.  Heaven will be worth it all and there will be no one there who did not really want to be there.

Advertisements

One response to “The inconvenient Jesus

  1. theodore abraham(abe)klassen January 4, 2014 at 23:27

    I like the way you explore the subject. Some brethren would be a little hesitant to endorse some comments. They make me”sit up and take notice” Carry on with my blessing. I particularily(sp) would commend you on heading these blogs

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: