Flatlander Faith

Apologetics from an Anabaptist perspective

Tag Archives: Nova Scotia

Book review – Without Proof by Janet Sketchley

Without Proof by Janet Sketchley

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


This book pushed all the right buttons to get me reading: cosy mystery; Christian; Canadian. Once I started, the suspense and deft pacing kept me going.

Amy Silver and her fiancé were in a plane crash that left him dead and her with a painful hip that is a constant reminder of what happened.

As it she needed reminders from her hip; the emotional wounds are far more painful and slow in healing. She has quit her bank job to live in the Nova Scotia home of her fiancé’s best friend and his aunt. She finds the work in Michael’s art studio a peaceful respite from the past (she looks after the business side). Michael’s aunt is warm and understanding, someone she can talk to when life is more than she can handle alone.

Then a reporter hints that the plane crash may not have been an accident. Mysterious, sometimes threatening, phone calls and messages come on her phone. Her father, whom she has never met, and thought she never wanted to meet, now wants to meet her. She believes that God wants nothing to do with her. She is falling in love with Michael, but feels he is pushing her away. Can life get any more complicated?

It does, and the ending is hair-raising. Of course, everything comes out right, but in ways that I didn’t see coming.

This book has it all, mystery, romance, a spiritual message woven in that is authentic without being preachy, all in a contemporary Canadian setting.

Available in e-pub or kindle format, from Kobo, Amazon and other e-book retailers.

How to choose a religion

“Fightin’ is no way to make converts; the true way is to win them. You may stop a man’s mouth Sam,” says he, “by a crammin’ a book down his throat, but you won’t convince him.  It’s a fine thing to write a book all covered over with Latin, and Greek, and Hebrew, like a bridle that’s real jam, all spangled with brass nails, but who knows whether it’s right or wrong?  Why, not one in ten thousand.  If I had my religion to choose, and warn’t able to judge for myself, I’ll tell you what I’d do: I’d just ask myself, Who leads the best lives?

-Thomas Chandler Haliburton, The Clockmaker, published 1836.

(Mr. Haliburton was a Nova Scotia judge and the author of humorous books  featuring Sam Slick, a fictional Yankee peddler, and his observations on life in Nova Scotia.)

The Bluenose

The picture in yesterday’s post showed Canada’s most famous ship,  the Bluenose, a fishing schooner launched at Lunenburg, Nova Scotia in 1921. The Bluenose won the International Fisherman’s Race numerous times in the 1920’s and 1930’s, being defeated only once. It also set the record for the largest load of fish brought into Lunenburg harbour. It has appeared on Canada’s ten cent coin since 1937.Canadian_Dime_-_reverse

How to choose a religion

“Fightin’ is no way to make converts; the true way is to win them. You may stop a man’s mouth Sam,” says he, “by a crammin’ a book down his throat, but you won’t convince him.  It’s a fine thing to write a book all covered over with Latin, and Greek, and Hebrew, like a bridle that’s real jam, all spangled with brass nails, but who knows whether it’s right or wrong?  Why, not one in ten thousand.  If I had my religion to choose, and warn’t able to judge for myself, I’ll tell you what I’d do: I’d just ask myself, Who leads the best lives?

-Thomas Chandler Haliburton, The Clockmaker, published 1836.

(Mr. Haliburton was a Nova Scotia judge and the author of humorous books  about Sam Slick, a fictional clockmaker and commentator on life in Nova Scotia.)

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