Flatlander Faith

Apologetics from an Anabaptist perspective

Tag Archives: folklore

Boxing Day musings

Feasting on Christmas Day has a long and noble tradition and one is at risk of being branded a heretic if he suggests it might not be necessary.

Noble in that first sentence is meant to be taken literally – for many centuries it was only the nobility and the rich who could afford to feast on Christmas Day, or any other day.

Many years ago it became the custom in England for rich families to give their servants a day off on the day after Christmas. They had served their masters on Christmas day, now it was their turn to go home to their families and celebrate. They didn’t go empty handed. They were given boxes with gifts, a little money and some of the food that was left from the Christmas day feast.  Thus was born the tradition of Boxing Day.

Boxing Day is a statutory holiday in Canada, but alas, it is no longer a day of giving. Rather it is a day when merchants put all their left over Christmas stock on sale at deep discounts. This means that everyone gets the day off except store employees. This is their busiest day of the year.

Sunday morning our minister in his message pointed out many of the things that most people believe about the birth of Jesus that are not found in the Bible. It’s about time. These things are being pointed out in newspaper and magazine articles and we’re getting to a situation where non-Christians know more about the facts of Jesus’ birth than Christians do.

My parents told me that my gifts on Christmas morning came from Santa Claus. It was almost 70 years ago, but I still remember how I felt when they told me that Santa Claus did not exist. My first thought was “What other lies have they been telling me?”

What do we have left when we strip away all the fanciful stories that have been added to the account of Jesus’ birth (why not just call them lies)? We have the account of the miraculous birth of the only begotten Son of God, coming into a fallen world to make a way for our redemption. And that is everything.

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Book Review – Talent is Not Enough

Here is the long-promised review of Mollie Hunter’s book on writing for children.  First let me warn you that this is not a “Christian” book, it is not a book for those who merely want to entertain children, nor is it a how-to book.

But it is an inspiring book. Mollie Hunter has a rare insight into the heart of a child; it is apparent from her book that being a mother was closer to her heart than being a writer. She began by writing stories for her own two children and learned from their reactions how to write words that reach the heart of a child.

She writes about the trend in children’s writing to cover topics that were once taboo. Her conviction is that since some of these topics are part of some children’s experience, it is OK to write about them if it is done with sensitivity. Then she delivers this caution:

“The distinction between the normal and the abnormal – this, to my mind, is where the dividing line should be drawn in themes for children’s writing, with all that lies on the side of the normal classed as suitable, and all on the other side as unsuitable. This, it seems to me, is where the convention of care must operate most strongly – particularly in those tender pre-pubertal years. Otherwise, the law of diminishing returns is immediately activated, and the writer will only succeed in rubbing the young reader’s nose in the dirt of the world before the same child has had the chance to realise that the world itself is a shining star.”

For insights such as this, and her thoughts on the use of language, I would recommend this book to those who aspire to write for children.

A large part of the book is taken up with thoughts on folklore, Scottish folklore in particular but her perspective can be applied to all folklore. She shares historical evidence that fairies and elves were real people, not Disneyesque caricatures with gossamer wings, but real people who were shunted aside in the migrations of peoples into new areas, yet still lived in isolated villages not far from the newcomers. These people may have been somewhat smaller in stature, or maybe not, but the difference in their customs and lifestyle gave rise to the tales that have come down to us. This insight in itself is worth the price of the book.

Talent is Not Enough, Mollie Hunter, © 1975

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