Flatlander Faith

Apologetics from an Anabaptist perspective

Tag Archives: flexibility

Good morning, it’s 2021!

Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay

Looking back, COVID-19 dominated the news and overturned many of our plans for the year that ended at midnight. But that was not all that was going on. As of Wednesday there have been 154 deaths from COVID in Saskatchewan. To the end of November there have been 323 deaths from drug overdoses. Those deaths have been more traumatic for families and relationships.

For many of us the year has been pretty ordinary, with just a few inconveniences. People have died from many other causes, babies have been born, couples have married, We have learned to wear masks, use hand sanitizer and go on with out daily lives. Families have spent more time together than they used to and learned to avoid getting too close to others in public places.

This year is going to be different. But lets not be too sure we know in what ways it will be different. That should be one lesson to carry with us from 2020. We have learned that we are more flexible than we thought; we can bend, and not break. Have we become flexible enough that God can use us?

There are hurting people all around us; the number of deaths from drug overdoses is just one symptom of that. Many people wish their lives could be different. Being flexible isn’t the whole solution to being able to offer hope to those who feel their lives are hopeless. First we need to listen. We need to be able to discern the hurt in the hearts of people around us, to recognize that anger, bitterness and despair are only noise to cover the real hurt.

May 2021 be a year when God teaches us how to hear.

Misfits

School tends to be a one size fits all proposition, and some children are misfits.

Despite the best efforts of schools and teachers, some children just do not do well in a large classroom. Home schooling parents have more freedom to find ways to adapt the curriculum and environment to make learning work for their child.

Children are hard-wired to learn from their parents, and parents know their children better than anyone else. Parents do not need special skills or training to teach their children, they just need to be parents.

Standard achievement tests show that home-schooled children score well above their peers in public schools. Even children with cognitive  limitations do better when home-schooled.

Now this is just a personal observation, but the home-schooled children that I know have much better social skills than their peers in school. Think about it: at home a child has to get along with her siblings and her parents. She learns how to communicate clearly with them all and this prepares her to communicate freely with anyone else, of any age.

A time to learn

Suddenly, almost unexpectedly, we were parents. We placed our baby into the blanket lined oval laundry basket on the seat between us and drove home.

Up to this point we had thought we knew all about how to raise a child. What we really had were strong ideas about the mistakes our parents had made and a determination not to repeat them. Well, life happens and you don’t have time to think about how you are going to react. It didn’t take long to realize we were making some of the mistakes that we had resolved to never make. But we were learning – about raising a baby and about ourselves.

The ideal age to become parents is somewhere between the stage where you feel completely helpless and the stage where you feel you have all the answers and it’s the baby’s fault if she doesn’t fit those answers.

We loved Michelle from the start. She wasn’t a difficult child and we weren’t totally incompetent parents. But the learning curve was pretty steep. “Love covers the multitudes of sins.” I believe that when a child feels loved the parent-child relationship will survive the mistakes of the parents. And we certainly did make mistakes.

When Michelle was about three months old, we noticed a bulge in her groin when she cried. We took her to the doctor who confirmed that it was a hernia. She had surgery to fix the hernia and was only in the hospital a few days. The hospital was in Carman, about 15 minutes away. I was busy at work, but Chris spent time with Michelle every day. I guess we, I, should have done more.

Chris’s birthday came March 27, when Michelle was five months old. We left her with Nancy, a friend from church, and went into Winnipeg to have dinner together. We had an enjoyable day, but when we got back we found that Nancy and Michelle had not. Every time Michelle saw Nancy’s face she began to scream. The only way Nancy could feed Michelle was to hold her so that she was facing away from her.

Several weeks later we went to the Polo Park Mall in Winnipeg to do some shopping. As soon as we walked in and Michelle saw all the people she began to scream. We went out until she settled down, then tried again, with the same result. For the rest of our day in town one of us would sit in the car with Michelle while the other shopped. After that day she seemed to trust that we weren’t going to abandon her again and there were no more incidents like that.

After a hot day in the summer we drove to Syl’s Ice Cream shop in Carman and bought milkshakes. There was some left in mine after we got home and I decided to see what Michelle would do with it. I put the container in her hands and the straw to her lips. She looked dubious. What is this thing? She started to suck on the straw and I watched the liquid rise slowly to the top. When it hit her mouth, the dubious look vanished and she began to suck on that straw in earnest. She was about nine months old.

%d bloggers like this: