Flatlander Faith

Apologetics from an Anabaptist perspective

Questions

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The techniques for evangelism known as the Church Growth Movement, were first introduced to North America in 1961. I use the word techniques deliberately, as the movement sought to use sociological research to select social groups that could be reached through the use of modern marketing methods. The key assumption of the movement was that people are most likely to feel comfortable with and trust people like themselves.

Does this sound like an opportunity to share the gospel more effectively?

Or does it sound like a description of the problem that we should expect the gospel to overcome?

Why are churches still the most segregated places in North America?

Has the Church Growth Movement done anything to heal tensions between ethnic groups?

How many close friends do you or I have who are of a different skin colour or different ethnic origin?

How open are we to changing that?

This is where we need to accept that the best way to change the world is to start with ourselves. We need to allow ourselves to be vulnerable. If we are to make any lasting friendships with people who are not just like us, we are going to learn that we have not always been such nice people as we thought we were. That might be painful, but it can be liberating, too.

Where there is neither Greek nor Jew, circumcision nor uncircumcision, Barbarian, Scythian, bond nor free: but Christ is all, and in all. Colossians 3:11 (Substitute the peoples in your city for the underlined words.)

One response to “Questions

  1. SKL July 3, 2020 at 13:17

    Thanks for the thought provoking words. As Jesus followers, and as God’s Church, we do need to empathize and love even as he did. We may have to become vulnerable, and choose to not remain ignorant. For to be ignorant of racial tensions or the fact racism exists, is essentially saying ‘I don’t really care.’ An excellent writing on this topic is found here. https://travelight94.com/2020/06/15/white-is-a-colour-confessions-n-questions-of-a-white-canadian-mennonite/

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